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State of the Union 2011, Obama

Tonight I want to begin by congratulating the men and women of the 112th Congress, as well as your new Speaker, John Boehner. And as we mark this occasion, we are also mindful of the empty chair in this Chamber, and pray for the health of our colleague – and our friend – Gabby Giffords.

It’s no secret that those of us here tonight have had our differences over the last two years. The debates have been contentious; we have fought fiercely for our beliefs. And that’s a good thing. That’s what a robust democracy demands. That’s what helps set us apart as a nation.

But there’s a reason the tragedy in Tucson gave us pause. Amid all the noise and passions and rancor of our public debate, Tucson reminded us that no matter who we are or where we come from, each of us is a part of something greater – something more consequential than party or political preference.

We are part of the American family. We believe that in a country where every race and faith and point of view can be found, we are still bound together as one people; that we share common hopes and a common creed; that the dreams of a little girl in Tucson are not so different than those of our own children, and that they all deserve the chance to be fulfilled.

That, too, is what sets us apart as a nation.

Now, by itself, this simple recognition won’t usher in a new era of cooperation. What comes of this moment is up to us. What comes of this moment will be determined not by whether we can sit together tonight, but whether we can work together tomorrow.

I believe we can. I believe we must. That’s what the people who sent us here expect of us. With their votes, they’ve determined that governing will now be a shared responsibility between parties. New laws will only pass with support from Democrats and Republicans. We will move forward together, or not at all – for the challenges we face are bigger than party, and bigger than politics.

At stake right now is not who wins the next election – after all, we just had an election. At stake is whether new jobs and industries take root in this country, or somewhere else. It’s whether the hard work and industry of our people is rewarded. It’s whether we sustain the leadership that has made America not just a place on a map, but a light to the world.

We are poised for progress. Two years after the worst recession most of us have ever known, the stock market has come roaring back. Corporate profits are up. The economy is growing again.

But we have never measured progress by these yardsticks alone. We measure progress by the success of our people. By the jobs they can find and the quality of life those jobs offer. By the prospects of a small business owner who dreams of turning a good idea into a thriving enterprise. By the opportunities for a better life that we pass on to our children.

That’s the project the American people want us to work on. Together.

We did that in December. Thanks to the tax cuts we passed, Americans’ paychecks are a little bigger today. Every business can write off the full cost of the new investments they make this year. These steps, taken by Democrats and Republicans, will grow the economy and add to the more than one million private sector jobs created last year.

But we have more work to do. The steps we’ve taken over the last two years may have broken the back of this recession – but to win the future, we’ll need to take on challenges that have been decades in the making.

Many people watching tonight can probably remember a time when finding a good job meant showing up at a nearby factory or a business downtown. You didn’t always need a degree, and your competition was pretty much limited to your neighbors. If you worked hard, chances are you’d have a job for life, with a decent paycheck, good benefits, and the occasional promotion. Maybe you’d even have the pride of seeing your kids work at the same company.

That world has changed. And for many, the change has been painful. I’ve seen it in the shuttered windows of once booming factories, and the vacant storefronts of once busy Main Streets. I’ve heard it in the frustrations of Americans who’ve seen their paychecks dwindle or their jobs disappear – proud men and women who feel like the rules have been changed in the middle of the game.

They’re right. The rules have changed. In a single generation, revolutions in technology have transformed the way we live, work and do business. Steel mills that once needed 1,000 workers can now do the same work with 100. Today, just about any company can set up shop, hire workers, and sell their products wherever there’s an internet connection.

Meanwhile, nations like China and India realized that with some changes of their own, they could compete in this new world. And so they started educating their children earlier and longer, with greater emphasis on math and science. They’re investing in research and new technologies. Just recently, China became home to the world’s largest private solar research facility, and the world’s fastest computer.

So yes, the world has changed. The competition for jobs is real. But this shouldn’t discourage us. It should challenge us. Remember – for all the hits we’ve taken these last few years, for all the naysayers predicting our decline, America still has the largest, most prosperous economy in the world. No workers are more productive than ours. No country has more successful companies, or grants more patents to inventors and entrepreneurs. We are home to the world’s best colleges and universities, where more students come to study than any other place on Earth.

What’s more, we are the first nation to be founded for the sake of an idea – the idea that each of us deserves the chance to shape our own destiny. That is why centuries of pioneers and immigrants have risked everything to come here. It’s why our students don’t just memorize equations, but answer questions like “What do you think of that idea? What would you change about the world? What do you want to be when you grow up?”

The future is ours to win. But to get there, we can’t just stand still. As Robert Kennedy told us, “The future is not a gift. It is an achievement.” Sustaining the American Dream has never been about standing pat. It has required each generation to sacrifice, and struggle, and meet the demands of a new age.

Now it’s our turn. We know what it takes to compete for the jobs and industries of our time. We need to out-innovate, out-educate, and out-build the rest of the world. We have to make America the best place on Earth to do business. We need to take responsibility for our deficit, and reform our government. That’s how our people will prosper. That’s how we’ll win the future. And tonight, I’d like to talk about how we get there.

The first step in winning the future is encouraging American innovation.

None of us can predict with certainty what the next big industry will be, or where the new jobs will come from. Thirty years ago, we couldn’t know that something called the Internet would lead to an economic revolution. What we can do – what America does better than anyone – is spark the creativity and imagination of our people. We are the nation that put cars in driveways and computers in offices; the nation of Edison and the Wright brothers; of Google and Facebook. In America, innovation doesn’t just change our lives. It’s how we make a living.

Our free enterprise system is what drives innovation. But because it’s not always profitable for companies to invest in basic research, throughout history our government has provided cutting-edge scientists and inventors with the support that they need. That’s what planted the seeds for the Internet. That’s what helped make possible things like computer chips and GPS.

Just think of all the good jobs – from manufacturing to retail – that have come from those breakthroughs.

Half a century ago, when the Soviets beat us into space with the launch of a satellite called Sputnik¸ we had no idea how we’d beat them to the moon. The science wasn’t there yet. NASA didn’t even exist. But after investing in better research and education, we didn’t just surpass the Soviets; we unleashed a wave of innovation that created new industries and millions of new jobs.

This is our generation’s Sputnik moment. Two years ago, I said that we needed to reach a level of research and development we haven’t seen since the height of the Space Race. In a few weeks, I will be sending a budget to Congress that helps us meet that goal. We’ll invest in biomedical research, information technology, and especially clean energy technology – an investment that will strengthen our security, protect our planet, and create countless new jobs for our people.

Already, we are seeing the promise of renewable energy. Robert and Gary Allen are brothers who run a small Michigan roofing company. After September 11th, they volunteered their best roofers to help repair the Pentagon. But half of their factory went unused, and the recession hit them hard.

Today, with the help of a government loan, that empty space is being used to manufacture solar shingles that are being sold all across the country. In Robert’s words, “We reinvented ourselves.”

That’s what Americans have done for over two hundred years: reinvented ourselves. And to spur on more success stories like the Allen Brothers, we’ve begun to reinvent our energy policy. We’re not just handing out money. We’re issuing a challenge. We’re telling America’s scientists and engineers that if they assemble teams of the best minds in their fields, and focus on the hardest problems in clean energy, we’ll fund the Apollo Projects of our time.

At the California Institute of Technology, they’re developing a way to turn sunlight and water into fuel for our cars. At Oak Ridge National Laboratory, they’re using supercomputers to get a lot more power out of our nuclear facilities. With more research and incentives, we can break our dependence on oil with biofuels, and become the first country to have 1 million electric vehicles on the road by 2015.

We need to get behind this innovation. And to help pay for it, I’m asking Congress to eliminate the billions in taxpayer dollars we currently give to oil companies. I don’t know if you’ve noticed, but they’re doing just fine on their own. So instead of subsidizing yesterday’s energy, let’s invest in tomorrow’s.

Now, clean energy breakthroughs will only translate into clean energy jobs if businesses know there will be a market for what they’re selling. So tonight, I challenge you to join me in setting a new goal: by 2035, 80% of America’s electricity will come from clean energy sources. Some folks want wind and solar. Others want nuclear, clean coal, and natural gas. To meet this goal, we will need them all – and I urge Democrats and Republicans to work together to make it happen.

Maintaining our leadership in research and technology is crucial to America’s success. But if we want to win the future – if we want innovation to produce jobs in America and not overseas – then we also have to win the race to educate our kids.

Think about it. Over the next ten years, nearly half of all new jobs will require education that goes beyond a high school degree. And yet, as many as a quarter of our students aren’t even finishing high school. The quality of our math and science education lags behind many other nations. America has fallen to 9th in the proportion of young people with a college degree. And so the question is whether all of us – as citizens, and as parents – are willing to do what’s necessary to give every child a chance to succeed.

That responsibility begins not in our classrooms, but in our homes and communities. It’s family that first instills the love of learning in a child. Only parents can make sure the TV is turned off and homework gets done. We need to teach our kids that it’s not just the winner of the Super Bowl who deserves to be celebrated, but the winner of the science fair; that success is not a function of fame or PR, but of hard work and discipline.

Our schools share this responsibility. When a child walks into a classroom, it should be a place of high expectations and high performance. But too many schools don’t meet this test. That’s why instead of just pouring money into a system that’s not working, we launched a competition called Race to the Top. To all fifty states, we said, “If you show us the most innovative plans to improve teacher quality and student achievement, we’ll show you the money.”

Race to the Top is the most meaningful reform of our public schools in a generation. For less than one percent of what we spend on education each year, it has led over 40 states to raise their standards for teaching and learning. These standards were developed, not by Washington, but by Republican and Democratic governors throughout the country. And Race to the Top should be the approach we follow this year as we replace No Child Left Behind with a law that is more flexible and focused on what’s best for our kids.

You see, we know what’s possible for our children when reform isn’t just a top-down mandate, but the work of local teachers and principals; school boards and communities.

Take a school like Bruce Randolph in Denver. Three years ago, it was rated one of the worst schools in Colorado; located on turf between two rival gangs. But last May, 97% of the seniors received their diploma. Most will be the first in their family to go to college. And after the first year of the school’s transformation, the principal who made it possible wiped away tears when a student said “Thank you, Mrs. Waters, for showing… that we are smart and we can make it.”

Let’s also remember that after parents, the biggest impact on a child’s success comes from the man or woman at the front of the classroom. In South Korea, teachers are known as “nation builders.” Here in America, it’s time we treated the people who educate our children with the same level of respect. We want to reward good teachers and stop making excuses for bad ones. And over the next ten years, with so many Baby Boomers retiring from our classrooms, we want to prepare 100,000 new teachers in the fields of science, technology, engineering, and math.

In fact, to every young person listening tonight who’s contemplating their career choice: If you want to make a difference in the life of our nation; if you want to make a difference in the life of a child – become a teacher. Your country needs you.

Of course, the education race doesn’t end with a high school diploma. To compete, higher education must be within reach of every American. That’s why we’ve ended the unwarranted taxpayer subsidies that went to banks, and used the savings to make college affordable for millions of students. And this year, I ask Congress to go further, and make permanent our tuition tax credit – worth $10,000 for four years of college.

Because people need to be able to train for new jobs and careers in today’s fast-changing economy, we are also revitalizing America’s community colleges. Last month, I saw the promise of these schools at Forsyth Tech in North Carolina. Many of the students there used to work in the surrounding factories that have since left town. One mother of two, a woman named Kathy Proctor, had worked in the furniture industry since she was 18 years old. And she told me she’s earning her degree in biotechnology now, at 55 years old, not just because the furniture jobs are gone, but because she wants to inspire her children to pursue their dreams too. As Kathy said, “I hope it tells them to never give up.”

If we take these steps – if we raise expectations for every child, and give them the best possible chance at an education, from the day they’re born until the last job they take – we will reach the goal I set two years ago: by the end of the decade, America will once again have the highest proportion of college graduates in the world.

One last point about education. Today, there are hundreds of thousands of students excelling in our schools who are not American citizens. Some are the children of undocumented workers, who had nothing to do with the actions of their parents. They grew up as Americans and pledge allegiance to our flag, and yet live every day with the threat of deportation. Others come here from abroad to study in our colleges and universities. But as soon as they obtain advanced degrees, we send them back home to compete against us. It makes no sense.

Now, I strongly believe that we should take on, once and for all, the issue of illegal immigration. I am prepared to work with Republicans and Democrats to protect our borders, enforce our laws and address the millions of undocumented workers who are now living in the shadows. I know that debate will be difficult and take time. But tonight, let’s agree to make that effort. And let’s stop expelling talented, responsible young people who can staff our research labs, start new businesses, and further enrich this nation.

The third step in winning the future is rebuilding America. To attract new businesses to our shores, we need the fastest, most reliable ways to move people, goods, and information – from high-speed rail to high-speed internet.

Our infrastructure used to be the best – but our lead has slipped. South Korean homes now have greater internet access than we do. Countries in Europe and Russia invest more in their roads and railways than we do. China is building faster trains and newer airports. Meanwhile, when our own engineers graded our nation’s infrastructure, they gave us a “D.”

We have to do better. America is the nation that built the transcontinental railroad, brought electricity to rural communities, and constructed the interstate highway system. The jobs created by these projects didn’t just come from laying down tracks or pavement. They came from businesses that opened near a town’s new train station or the new off-ramp.

Over the last two years, we have begun rebuilding for the 21st century, a project that has meant thousands of good jobs for the hard-hit construction industry. Tonight, I’m proposing that we redouble these efforts.

We will put more Americans to work repairing crumbling roads and bridges. We will make sure this is fully paid for, attract private investment, and pick projects based on what’s best for the economy, not politicians.

Within 25 years, our goal is to give 80% of Americans access to high-speed rail, which could allow you go places in half the time it takes to travel by car. For some trips, it will be faster than flying – without the pat-down. As we speak, routes in California and the Midwest are already underway.

Within the next five years, we will make it possible for business to deploy the next generation of high-speed wireless coverage to 98% of all Americans. This isn’t just about a faster internet and fewer dropped calls. It’s about connecting every part of America to the digital age. It’s about a rural community in Iowa or Alabama where farmers and small business owners will be able to sell their products all over the world. It’s about a firefighter who can download the design of a burning building onto a handheld device; a student who can take classes with a digital textbook; or a patient who can have face-to-face video chats with her doctor.

All these investments – in innovation, education, and infrastructure – will make America a better place to do business and create jobs. But to help our companies compete, we also have to knock down barriers that stand in the way of their success.

Over the years, a parade of lobbyists has rigged the tax code to benefit particular companies and industries. Those with accountants or lawyers to work the system can end up paying no taxes at all. But all the rest are hit with one of the highest corporate tax rates in the world. It makes no sense, and it has to change.

So tonight, I’m asking Democrats and Republicans to simplify the system. Get rid of the loopholes. Level the playing field. And use the savings to lower the corporate tax rate for the first time in 25 years – without adding to our deficit.

To help businesses sell more products abroad, we set a goal of doubling our exports by 2014 – because the more we export, the more jobs we create at home. Already, our exports are up. Recently, we signed agreements with India and China that will support more than 250,000 jobs in the United States. And last month, we finalized a trade agreement with South Korea that will support at least 70,000 American jobs. This agreement has unprecedented support from business and labor; Democrats and Republicans, and I ask this Congress to pass it as soon as possible.

Before I took office, I made it clear that we would enforce our trade agreements, and that I would only sign deals that keep faith with American workers, and promote American jobs. That’s what we did with Korea, and that’s what I intend to do as we pursue agreements with Panama and Colombia, and continue our Asia Pacific and global trade talks.

To reduce barriers to growth and investment, I’ve ordered a review of government regulations. When we find rules that put an unnecessary burden on businesses, we will fix them. But I will not hesitate to create or enforce commonsense safeguards to protect the American people. That’s what we’ve done in this country for more than a century. It’s why our food is safe to eat, our water is safe to drink, and our air is safe to breathe. It’s why we have speed limits and child labor laws. It’s why last year, we put in place consumer protections against hidden fees and penalties by credit card companies, and new rules to prevent another financial crisis. And it’s why we passed reform that finally prevents the health insurance industry from exploiting patients.

Now, I’ve heard rumors that a few of you have some concerns about the new health care law. So let me be the first to say that anything can be improved. If you have ideas about how to improve this law by making care better or more affordable, I am eager to work with you. We can start right now by correcting a flaw in the legislation that has placed an unnecessary bookkeeping burden on small businesses.

What I’m not willing to do is go back to the days when insurance companies could deny someone coverage because of a pre-existing condition. I’m not willing to tell James Howard, a brain cancer patient from Texas, that his treatment might not be covered. I’m not willing to tell Jim Houser, a small business owner from Oregon, that he has to go back to paying $5,000 more to cover his employees. As we speak, this law is making prescription drugs cheaper for seniors and giving uninsured students a chance to stay on their parents’ coverage. So instead of re-fighting the battles of the last two years, let’s fix what needs fixing and move forward.

Now, the final step – a critical step – in winning the future is to make sure we aren’t buried under a mountain of debt.

We are living with a legacy of deficit-spending that began almost a decade ago. And in the wake of the financial crisis, some of that was necessary to keep credit flowing, save jobs, and put money in people’s pockets.

But now that the worst of the recession is over, we have to confront the fact that our government spends more than it takes in. That is not sustainable. Every day, families sacrifice to live within their means. They deserve a government that does the same.

So tonight, I am proposing that starting this year, we freeze annual domestic spending for the next five years. This would reduce the deficit by more than $400 billion over the next decade, and will bring discretionary spending to the lowest share of our economy since Dwight Eisenhower was president.

This freeze will require painful cuts. Already, we have frozen the salaries of hardworking federal employees for the next two years. I’ve proposed cuts to things I care deeply about, like community action programs. The Secretary of Defense has also agreed to cut tens of billions of dollars in spending that he and his generals believe our military can do without.

I recognize that some in this Chamber have already proposed deeper cuts, and I’m willing to eliminate whatever we can honestly afford to do without. But let’s make sure that we’re not doing it on the backs of our most vulnerable citizens. And let’s make sure what we’re cutting is really excess weight. Cutting the deficit by gutting our investments in innovation and education is like lightening an overloaded airplane by removing its engine. It may feel like you’re flying high at first, but it won’t take long before you’ll feel the impact.

Now, most of the cuts and savings I’ve proposed only address annual domestic spending, which represents a little more than 12% of our budget. To make further progress, we have to stop pretending that cutting this kind of spending alone will be enough. It won’t.

The bipartisan Fiscal Commission I created last year made this crystal clear. I don’t agree with all their proposals, but they made important progress. And their conclusion is that the only way to tackle our deficit is to cut excessive spending wherever we find it – in domestic spending, defense spending, health care spending, and spending through tax breaks and loopholes.

This means further reducing health care costs, including programs like Medicare and Medicaid, which are the single biggest contributor to our long-term deficit. Health insurance reform will slow these rising costs, which is part of why nonpartisan economists have said that repealing the health care law would add a quarter of a trillion dollars to our deficit. Still, I’m willing to look at other ideas to bring down costs, including one that Republicans suggested last year: medical malpractice reform to rein in frivolous lawsuits.

To put us on solid ground, we should also find a bipartisan solution to strengthen Social Security for future generations. And we must do it without putting at risk current retirees, the most vulnerable, or people with disabilities; without slashing benefits for future generations; and without subjecting Americans’ guaranteed retirement income to the whims of the stock market.

And if we truly care about our deficit, we simply cannot afford a permanent extension of the tax cuts for the wealthiest 2% of Americans. Before we take money away from our schools, or scholarships away from our students, we should ask millionaires to give up their tax break.

It’s not a matter of punishing their success. It’s about promoting America’s success.

In fact, the best thing we could do on taxes for all Americans is to simplify the individual tax code. This will be a tough job, but members of both parties have expressed interest in doing this, and I am prepared to join them.

So now is the time to act. Now is the time for both sides and both houses of Congress – Democrats and Republicans – to forge a principled compromise that gets the job done. If we make the hard choices now to rein in our deficits, we can make the investments we need to win the future.

Let me take this one step further. We shouldn’t just give our people a government that’s more affordable. We should give them a government that’s more competent and efficient. We cannot win the future with a government of the past.

We live and do business in the information age, but the last major reorganization of the government happened in the age of black and white TV. There are twelve different agencies that deal with exports. There are at least five different entities that deal with housing policy. Then there’s my favorite example: the Interior Department is in charge of salmon while they’re in fresh water, but the Commerce Department handles them in when they’re in saltwater. And I hear it gets even more complicated once they’re smoked.

Now, we have made great strides over the last two years in using technology and getting rid of waste. Veterans can now download their electronic medical records with a click of the mouse. We’re selling acres of federal office space that hasn’t been used in years, and we will cut through red tape to get rid of more. But we need to think bigger. In the coming months, my administration will develop a proposal to merge, consolidate, and reorganize the federal government in a way that best serves the goal of a more competitive America. I will submit that proposal to Congress for a vote – and we will push to get it passed.

In the coming year, we will also work to rebuild people’s faith in the institution of government. Because you deserve to know exactly how and where your tax dollars are being spent, you will be able to go to a website and get that information for the very first time in history. Because you deserve to know when your elected officials are meeting with lobbyists, I ask Congress to do what the White House has already done: put that information online. And because the American people deserve to know that special interests aren’t larding up legislation with pet projects, both parties in Congress should know this: if a bill comes to my desk with earmarks inside, I will veto it.

A 21st century government that’s open and competent. A government that lives within its means. An economy that’s driven by new skills and ideas. Our success in this new and changing world will require reform, responsibility, and innovation. It will also require us to approach that world with a new level of engagement in our foreign affairs.

Just as jobs and businesses can now race across borders, so can new threats and new challenges. No single wall separates East and West; no one rival superpower is aligned against us.

And so we must defeat determined enemies wherever they are, and build coalitions that cut across lines of region and race and religion. America’s moral example must always shine for all who yearn for freedom, justice, and dignity. And because we have begun this work, tonight we can say that American leadership has been renewed and America’s standing has been restored.

Look to Iraq, where nearly 100,000 of our brave men and women have left with their heads held high; where American combat patrols have ended; violence has come down; and a new government has been formed. This year, our civilians will forge a lasting partnership with the Iraqi people, while we finish the job of bringing our troops out of Iraq. America’s commitment has been kept; the Iraq War is coming to an end.

Of course, as we speak, al Qaeda and their affiliates continue to plan attacks against us. Thanks to our intelligence and law enforcement professionals, we are disrupting plots and securing our cities and skies. And as extremists try to inspire acts of violence within our borders, we are responding with the strength of our communities, with respect for the rule of law, and with the conviction that American Muslims are a part of our American family.

We have also taken the fight to al Qaeda and their allies abroad. In Afghanistan, our troops have taken Taliban strongholds and trained Afghan Security Forces. Our purpose is clear – by preventing the Taliban from reestablishing a stranglehold over the Afghan people, we will deny al Qaeda the safe-haven that served as a launching pad for 9/11.

Thanks to our heroic troops and civilians, fewer Afghans are under the control of the insurgency. There will be tough fighting ahead, and the Afghan government will need to deliver better governance. But we are strengthening the capacity of the Afghan people and building an enduring partnership with them. This year, we will work with nearly 50 countries to begin a transition to an Afghan lead. And this July, we will begin to bring our troops home.

In Pakistan, al Qaeda’s leadership is under more pressure than at any point since 2001. Their leaders and operatives are being removed from the battlefield. Their safe-havens are shrinking. And we have sent a message from the Afghan border to the Arabian Peninsula to all parts of the globe: we will not relent, we will not waver, and we will defeat you.

American leadership can also be seen in the effort to secure the worst weapons of war. Because Republicans and Democrats approved the New START Treaty, far fewer nuclear weapons and launchers will be deployed. Because we rallied the world, nuclear materials are being locked down on every continent so they never fall into the hands of terrorists.

Because of a diplomatic effort to insist that Iran meet its obligations, the Iranian government now faces tougher and tighter sanctions than ever before. And on the Korean peninsula, we stand with our ally South Korea, and insist that North Korea keeps its commitment to abandon nuclear weapons.

This is just a part of how we are shaping a world that favors peace and prosperity. With our European allies, we revitalized NATO, and increased our cooperation on everything from counter-terrorism to missile defense. We have reset our relationship with Russia, strengthened Asian alliances, and built new partnerships with nations like India. This March, I will travel to Brazil, Chile, and El Salvador to forge new alliances for progress in the Americas. Around the globe, we are standing with those who take responsibility – helping farmers grow more food; supporting doctors who care for the sick; and combating the corruption that can rot a society and rob people of opportunity.

Recent events have shown us that what sets us apart must not just be our power – it must be the purpose behind it. In South Sudan – with our assistance – the people were finally able to vote for independence after years of war. Thousands lined up before dawn. People danced in the streets. One man who lost four of his brothers at war summed up the scene around him: “This was a battlefield for most of my life. Now we want to be free.”

We saw that same desire to be free in Tunisia, where the will of the people proved more powerful than the writ of a dictator. And tonight, let us be clear: the United States of America stands with the people of Tunisia, and supports the democratic aspirations of all people.

We must never forget that the things we’ve struggled for, and fought for, live in the hearts of people everywhere. And we must always remember that the Americans who have borne the greatest burden in this struggle are the men and women who serve our country.

Tonight, let us speak with one voice in reaffirming that our nation is united in support of our troops and their families. Let us serve them as well as they have served us – by giving them the equipment they need; by providing them with the care and benefits they have earned; and by enlisting our veterans in the great task of building our own nation.

Our troops come from every corner of this country – they are black, white, Latino, Asian and Native American. They are Christian and Hindu, Jewish and Muslim. And, yes, we know that some of them are gay. Starting this year, no American will be forbidden from serving the country they love because of who they love. And with that change, I call on all of our college campuses to open their doors to our military recruiters and the ROTC. It is time to leave behind the divisive battles of the past. It is time to move forward as one nation.

We should have no illusions about the work ahead of us. Reforming our schools; changing the way we use energy; reducing our deficit – none of this is easy. All of it will take time. And it will be harder because we will argue about everything. The cost. The details. The letter of every law.

Of course, some countries don’t have this problem. If the central government wants a railroad, they get a railroad – no matter how many homes are bulldozed. If they don’t want a bad story in the newspaper, it doesn’t get written.

And yet, as contentious and frustrating and messy as our democracy can sometimes be, I know there isn’t a person here who would trade places with any other nation on Earth.

We may have differences in policy, but we all believe in the rights enshrined in our Constitution. We may have different opinions, but we believe in the same promise that says this is a place where you can make it if you try. We may have different backgrounds, but we believe in the same dream that says this is a country where anything’s possible. No matter who you are. No matter where you come from.

That dream is why I can stand here before you tonight. That dream is why a working class kid from Scranton can stand behind me. That dream is why someone who began by sweeping the floors of his father’s Cincinnati bar can preside as Speaker of the House in the greatest nation on Earth.

That dream – that American Dream – is what drove the Allen Brothers to reinvent their roofing company for a new era. It’s what drove those students at Forsyth Tech to learn a new skill and work towards the future. And that dream is the story of a small business owner named Brandon Fisher.

Brandon started a company in Berlin, Pennsylvania that specializes in a new kind of drilling technology. One day last summer, he saw the news that halfway across the world, 33 men were trapped in a Chilean mine, and no one knew how to save them.

But Brandon thought his company could help. And so he designed a rescue that would come to be known as Plan B. His employees worked around the clock to manufacture the necessary drilling equipment. And Brandon left for Chile.

Along with others, he began drilling a 2,000 foot hole into the ground, working three or four days at a time with no sleep. Thirty-seven days later, Plan B succeeded, and the miners were rescued. But because he didn’t want all of the attention, Brandon wasn’t there when the miners emerged. He had already gone home, back to work on his next project.

Later, one of his employees said of the rescue, “We proved that Center Rock is a little company, but we do big things.”

We do big things.

From the earliest days of our founding, America has been the story of ordinary people who dare to dream. That’s how we win the future.

We are a nation that says, “I might not have a lot of money, but I have this great idea for a new company. I might not come from a family of college graduates, but I will be the first to get my degree. I might not know those people in trouble, but I think I can help them, and I need to try. I’m not sure how we’ll reach that better place beyond the horizon, but I know we’ll get there. I know we will.”

We do big things.

The idea of America endures. Our destiny remains our choice. And tonight, more than two centuries later, it is because of our people that our future is hopeful, our journey goes forward, and the state of our union is strong.

Thank you, God Bless You, and may God Bless the United States of America.

2011/01/31 09:51 2011/01/31 09:51
Posted
Filed under About Knowledge/English

 얼마전 어느 기사를 보던 중 FY11 이라는 단어를 봤습니다. 찾아보니 '회계년도 2011년' 이라는 뜻이라고 합니다. 관련해서 여러 약어들 입니다.

FY : Fiscal Year 회계년도

CY ; calendar year

Invoice - 송장( 매매계약 조건을 정당하게 이행하였음을 밝히는, 판매자(수출업자) 구매자 (수입업자)에게 보내는 서류)

 year-to-year : 전년동월비(for the last year)

 year-on-year : 전년동기대비

 capicatl turnover : 자본회전율

 coperation's own stock : 자사주

 self-employer : 자영업자

 AOP(Annual Operating Plan) : 연간사업계획

 BEP(Break Even Point) : 손익분기점

 BOD(Board of Director) : 이사회

 BOY(Balance of Year) : 해당연도중 남은 기간

 B/S(Balance Sheet) : 대차대조표

 CEO(Chief Executive Officer) : 경영최고책임자, 사장

 CFO(Chief Financial Officer) : 최무부문 최고책임자

 INC(Income) : 수입

 INT(Interest) : 이자

 IRR(Internal Rate of Return) : 내부수익율

 LAB Dir. (Labor Direct) : 직접노무비

 LC(Local Currency) : 현지통화

 LO(Learning Organization) : 학습조직

 MBO(Management by Object) : 목표관리제도

 MBWA(Management by Wondering(Working) Around) : 현장중시경영

 M/S(Market Share) : 시장점유율

 NAB(Net Asset Base) : 순자산

 ROI(Return On Investment) : 투자수익율

 YAG(Year Ago) : 전년도

 YE(Year Ending) : 연말시점

 YTD(Year to Dates) : 회계년도 시작부터 현재까지

2010/09/30 23:29 2010/09/30 23:29
Posted
Filed under About Knowledge/English
* take advantage of : …을 이용하다, 기회로 삼다
* at one's fingertips : 손쉽게, 메모지를 이용하여, 키보드르 손가락으로 건드려 인터넷 검색을 통해
2009/12/21 10:52 2009/12/21 10:52
Posted
Filed under About Knowledge/English
올해 초 오바마 미국 대통령이 취임했습니다.

당시엔 별 관심을 두지 않았는데, 어느 블로거의 글을 보다 갑자가 호기심이 생겼습니다.

물론 극 미량의 영어능력을 보유 하고 있는 관계로, 다 알아 먹지는 못 했습니다.

그래서, 차근히 다시 보고자 합니다.

달변가(?) 하는 오바마의 생각과 언변을 훔쳐 보도록 하겠습니다. ^^

MP3도 함께 올립니다.



Obama Inauguration Speech(mp3)



Barack Obama was sworn in as the 44th president of the United States and the nation's first African-American president Tuesday. This is a transcript of his prepared speech by CNN,

My fellow citizens:
I stand here today humbled by the task before us, grateful for the trust you have bestowed, mindful of the sacrifices borne by our ancestors. I thank President Bush for his service to our nation, as well as the generosity and cooperation he has shown throughout this transition.
Forty-four Americans have now taken the presidential oath. The words have been spoken during rising tides of prosperity and the still waters of peace. Yet, every so often, the oath is taken amidst gathering clouds and raging storms. At these moments, America has carried on not simply because of the skill or vision of those in high office, but because We the People have remained faithful to the ideals of our forebearers, and true to our founding documents.
So it has been. So it must be with this generation of Americans.
That we are in the midst of crisis is now well understood. Our nation is at war, against a far-reaching network of violence and hatred. Our economy is badly weakened, a consequence of greed and irresponsibility on the part of some, but also our collective failure to make hard choices and prepare the nation for a new age. Homes have been lost; jobs shed; businesses shuttered. Our health care is too costly; our schools fail too many; and each day brings further evidence that the ways we use energy strengthen our adversaries and threaten our planet.
These are the indicators of crisis, subject to data and statistics. Less measurable but no less profound is a sapping of confidence across our land -- a nagging fear that America's decline is inevitable, and that the next generation must lower its sights.

Today I say to you that the challenges we face are real. They are serious and they are many. They will not be met easily or in a short span of time. But know this, America: They will be met.
On this day, we gather because we have chosen hope over fear, unity of purpose over conflict and discord.
On this day, we come to proclaim an end to the petty grievances and false promises, the recriminations and worn-out dogmas, that for far too long have strangled our politics.
We remain a young nation, but in the words of Scripture, the time has come to set aside childish things. The time has come to reaffirm our enduring spirit; to choose our better history; to carry forward that precious gift, that noble idea, passed on from generation to generation: the God-given promise that all are equal, all are free, and all deserve a chance to pursue their full measure of happiness.
In reaffirming the greatness of our nation, we understand that greatness is never a given. It must be earned. Our journey has never been one of shortcuts or settling for less. It has not been the path for the fainthearted -- for those who prefer leisure over work, or seek only the pleasures of riches and fame. Rather, it has been the risk-takers, the doers, the makers of things -- some celebrated, but more often men and women obscure in their labor -- who have carried us up the long, rugged path toward prosperity and freedom.
For us, they packed up their few worldly possessions and traveled across oceans in search of a new life.
For us, they toiled in sweatshops and settled the West; endured the lash of the whip and plowed the hard earth.

For us, they fought and died, in places like Concord and Gettysburg; Normandy and Khe Sahn.
Time and again, these men and women struggled and sacrificed and worked till their hands were raw so that we might live a better life. They saw America as bigger than the sum of our individual ambitions; greater than all the differences of birth or wealth or faction.
This is the journey we continue today. We remain the most prosperous, powerful nation on Earth. Our workers are no less productive than when this crisis began. Our minds are no less inventive, our goods and services no less needed than they were last week or last month or last year. Our capacity remains undiminished. But our time of standing pat, of protecting narrow interests and putting off unpleasant decisions -- that time has surely passed. Starting today, we must pick ourselves up, dust ourselves off, and begin again the work of remaking America.
For everywhere we look, there is work to be done. The state of the economy calls for action, bold and swift, and we will act -- not only to create new jobs, but to lay a new foundation for growth. We will build the roads and bridges, the electric grids and digital lines that feed our commerce and bind us together. We will restore science to its rightful place, and wield technology's wonders to raise health care's quality and lower its cost. We will harness the sun and the winds and the soil to fuel our cars and run our factories. And we will transform our schools and colleges and universities to meet the demands of a new age. All this we can do. And all this we will do.
Now, there are some who question the scale of our ambitions -- who suggest that our system cannot tolerate too many big plans. Their memories are short. For they have forgotten what this country has already done; what free men and women can achieve when imagination is joined to common purpose, and necessity to courage.
What the cynics fail to understand is that the ground has shifted beneath them -- that the stale political arguments that have consumed us for so long no longer apply. The question we ask today is not whether our government is too big or too small, but whether it works -- whether it helps families find jobs at a decent wage, care they can afford, a retirement that is dignified. Where the answer is yes, we intend to move forward. Where the answer is no, programs will end. And those of us who manage the public's dollars will be held to account -- to spend wisely, reform bad habits, and do our business in the light of day -- because only then can we restore the vital trust between a people and their government.
Nor is the question before us whether the market is a force for good or ill. Its power to generate wealth and expand freedom is unmatched, but this crisis has reminded us that without a watchful eye, the market can spin out of control -- and that a nation cannot prosper long when it favors only the prosperous. The success of our economy has always depended not just on the size of our gross domestic product, but on the reach of our prosperity; on our ability to extend opportunity to every willing heart -- not out of charity, but because it is the surest route to our common good.
As for our common defense, we reject as false the choice between our safety and our ideals. Our Founding Fathers, faced with perils we can scarcely imagine, drafted a charter to assure the rule of law and the rights of man, a charter expanded by the blood of generations. Those ideals still light the world, and we will not give them up for expedience's sake. And so to all other peoples and governments who are watching today, from the grandest capitals to the small village where my father was born: Know that America is a friend of each nation and every man, woman and child who seeks a future of peace and dignity, and that we are ready to lead once more.
Recall that earlier generations faced down fascism and communism not just with missiles and tanks, but with sturdy alliances and enduring convictions. They understood that our power alone cannot protect us, nor does it entitle us to do as we please. Instead, they knew that our power grows through its prudent use; our security emanates from the justness of our cause, the force of our example, the tempering qualities of humility and restraint.
We are the keepers of this legacy. Guided by these principles once more, we can meet those new threats that demand even greater effort -- even greater cooperation and understanding between nations. We will begin to responsibly leave Iraq to its people, and forge a hard-earned peace in Afghanistan. With old friends and former foes, we will work tirelessly to lessen the nuclear threat, and roll back the specter of a warming planet. We will not apologize for our way of life, nor will we waver in its defense, and for those who seek to advance their aims by inducing terror and slaughtering innocents, we say to you now that our spirit is stronger and cannot be broken; you cannot outlast us, and we will defeat you.
For we know that our patchwork heritage is a strength, not a weakness. We are a nation of Christians and Muslims, Jews and Hindus -- and nonbelievers. We are shaped by every language and culture, drawn from every end of this Earth; and because we have tasted the bitter swill of civil war and segregation, and emerged from that dark chapter stronger and more united, we cannot help but believe that the old hatreds shall someday pass; that the lines of tribe shall soon dissolve; that as the world grows smaller, our common humanity shall reveal itself; and that America must play its role in ushering in a new era of peace.
To the Muslim world, we seek a new way forward, based on mutual interest and mutual respect. To those leaders around the globe who seek to sow conflict, or blame their society's ills on the West: Know that your people will judge you on what you can build, not what you destroy. To those who cling to power through corruption and deceit and the silencing of dissent, know that you are on the wrong side of history; but that we will extend a hand if you are willing to unclench your fist.
To the people of poor nations, we pledge to work alongside you to make your farms flourish and let clean waters flow; to nourish starved bodies and feed hungry minds. And to those nations like ours that enjoy relative plenty, we say we can no longer afford indifference to suffering outside our borders; nor can we consume the world's resources without regard to effect. For the world has changed, and we must change with it.
As we consider the road that unfolds before us, we remember with humble gratitude those brave Americans who, at this very hour, patrol far-off deserts and distant mountains. They have something to tell us today, just as the fallen heroes who lie in Arlington whisper through the ages. We honor them not only because they are guardians of our liberty, but because they embody the spirit of service; a willingness to find meaning in something greater than themselves. And yet, at this moment -- a moment that will define a generation -- it is precisely this spirit that must inhabit us all.
For as much as government can do and must do, it is ultimately the faith and determination of the American people upon which this nation relies. It is the kindness to take in a stranger when the levees break, the selflessness of workers who would rather cut their hours than see a friend lose their job which sees us through our darkest hours. It is the firefighter's courage to storm a stairway filled with smoke, but also a parent's willingness to nurture a child, that finally decides our fate.
Our challenges may be new. The instruments with which we meet them may be new. But those values upon which our success depends -- hard work and honesty, courage and fair play, tolerance and curiosity, loyalty and patriotism -- these things are old. These things are true. They have been the quiet force of progress throughout our history. What is demanded then is a return to these truths. What is required of us now is a new era of responsibility -- a recognition, on the part of every American, that we have duties to ourselves, our nation and the world; duties that we do not grudgingly accept but rather seize gladly, firm in the knowledge that there is nothing so satisfying to the spirit, so defining of our character, than giving our all to a difficult task.
This is the price and the promise of citizenship.
This is the source of our confidence -- the knowledge that God calls on us to shape an uncertain destiny.
This is the meaning of our liberty and our creed -- why men and women and children of every race and every faith can join in celebration across this magnificent Mall, and why a man whose father less than 60 years ago might not have been served at a local restaurant can now stand before you to take a most sacred oath.
So let us mark this day with remembrance, of who we are and how far we have traveled. In the year of America's birth, in the coldest of months, a small band of patriots huddled by dying campfires on the shores of an icy river. The capital was abandoned. The enemy was advancing. The snow was stained with blood. At a moment when the outcome of our revolution was most in doubt, the father of our nation ordered these words be read to the people:
"Let it be told to the future world ... that in the depth of winter, when nothing but hope and virtue could survive... that the city and the country, alarmed at one common danger, came forth to meet [it]."
America. In the face of our common dangers, in this winter of our hardship, let us remember these timeless words. With hope and virtue, let us brave once more the icy currents, and endure what storms may come. Let it be said by our children's children that when we were tested, we refused to let this journey end, that we did not turn back, nor did we falter; and with eyes fixed on the horizon and God's grace upon us, we carried forth that great gift of freedom and delivered it safely to future generations.

==================================================================================================
밑에는 해석

My fellow citizens:
친애하는 국민 여러분,


I stand here today humbled by the task before us, grateful for the trust you have bestowed, mindful of the sacrifices borne by our ancestors. I thank President Bush for his service to our nation, as well as the generosity and cooperation he has shown throughout this transition.
저 는 우리 선조들의 희생을 기리는 마음으로, 여러분들이 제게 보내준 신뢰에 감사하는 마음으로, 그리고 우리 앞에 놓여진 책무를 겸허히 생각하는 마음으로 오늘 이 자리에 섰습니다. 저는 부시 대통령이 정권 인수 과정에서 보여준 아낌없는 배려와 협력, 그리고 그가 그동안 나라를 위해 헌신하신 데 대해 감사를 드립니다.


Forty-four Americans have now taken the presidential oath. The words have been spoken during rising tides of prosperity and the still waters of peace. Yet, every so often the oath is taken amidst gathering clouds and raging storms. At these moments, America has carried on not simply because of the skill or vision of those in high office, but because We the People have remained faithful to the ideals of our forbearers, and true to our founding documents.
이 제 저를 포함해 마흔 네 명의 대통령이 취임선서를 하게 된 셈입니다. 많은 선서들은 떠오르는 번영의 조류와 잔잔한 평화의 물결의 시대에 행해졌지만 때로 어떤 선서는 먹구름이 잔뜩 끼고 성난 폭풍우가 몰아치는 시대에 행해지기도 합니다. 지금까지 미국은 잘 꾸려져 왔습니다. 오로지 대통령과 그 참모들의 기술이나 비전 덕분이 아니라 그들을 포함한 모든 국민들 스스로가 선조들의 이상과 건국 문서들(의 이념)에 충실했었기 때문입니다.


So it has been. So it must be with this generation of Americans.
지금껏 그래왔듯이 현 세대의 미국에서도 그래야 합니다.

That we are in the midst of crisis is now well understood. Our nation is at war, against a far-reaching network of violence and hatred. Our economy is badly weakened, a consequence of greed and irresponsibility on the part of some, but also our collective failure to make hard choices and prepare the nation for a new age. Homes have been lost; jobs shed; businesses shuttered. Our health care is too costly; our schools fail too many; and each day brings further evidence that the ways we use energy strengthen our adversaries and threaten our planet.
우 리 모두 현재 위기의 한가운데 있다는 사실을 잘 알고 있습니다. 우리나라는 그물처럼 폭넓게 뻗은 폭력 및 증오와 전쟁 중입니다. 우리의 경제는 일부의 탐욕과 무책임함, 그리고 새로운 시대를 준비하고 어려운 결정들을 내리는 데 있어 총체적으로 실패한 결과 매우 약해졌습니다. (가족은) 집을 잃고 (근로자는) 직장에서 해고당하고 기업들은 문을 닫았습니다. 의료 비용은 너무나 비싸고, 학교들은 너무 많이 실패하고, 우리가 힘을 사용하는 (그릇된) 방식이 우리의 적들을 강화시키고 (동시에) 전세계를 위협하고 있다는 더 많은 증거들이 매일같이 속속 드러나고 있습니다.

These are the indicators of crisis, subject to data and statistics. Less measurable but no less profound is a sapping of confidence across our land - a nagging fear that America's decline is inevitable, and that the next generation must lower its sights.
이 러한 것들은 바로 각종 자료와 통계에 의존한 위기의 신호입니다. 쇠락을 피할 수 없다는 두려움, 다음 세대는 목표를 낮추어야 할 것이라는 두려움과 같은 미국 전역을 사로잡고 있는 자신감의 고갈은 측정하기 힘들지만 매우 심각합니다.

Today I say to you that the challenges we face are real. They are serious and they are many. They will not be met easily or in a short span of time. But know this, America - they will be met.
오 늘 저는 여러분께 말씀드립니다. 우리가 처한 도전들은 현실이고, 심각할 뿐만 아니라, 또한 매우 많다는 것을 말입니다. 그 도전들은 쉽게 또는 짧은 기간에 해결되지는 않을 것이지만 이것만은 알아두십시오. 우리는 결국 해낼 것입니다.

On this day, we gather because we have chosen hope over fear, unity of purpose over conflict and discord.
오늘 우리는, 두려움보다는 희망을 선택했고, 갈등과 불화보다는 목적을 위한 단결을 선택했기 때문에 여기 모였습니다.

On this day, we come to proclaim an end to the petty grievances and false promises, the recriminations and worn out dogmas, that for far too long have strangled our politics.
오늘 우리는, 우리의 정치를 오랫동안 옥죄어왔던 사소한 불만들과 거짓 공약들, 상호비방과 낡은 독단론들에 종식을 선언하기 위해 여기에 왔습니다.

We remain a young nation, but in the words of Scripture, the time has come to set aside childish things.
미국은 여전히 젊은 나라지만 이제는 성서의 말씀대로 유치함을 버릴 때가 왔습니다.

The time has come to reaffirm our enduring spirit; to choose our better history; to carry forward that precious gift, that noble idea, passed on from generation to generation: the God-given promise that all are equal, all are free, and all deserve a chance to pursue their full measure of happiness.
우 리의 인내심을 다시 확인할 때가, 더 나은 역사를 선택할 때가, 세대를 지나면서 물려받은 소중한 선물인 고귀한 이상을 계속 앞으로 넘겨줄 때가 왔습니다. 즉 만인은 평등하고 자유로우며 또한 모두 충분한 행복을 추구할 기회를 가질 자격이 있다는 천부의 약속 말입니다.

In reaffirming the greatness of our nation, we understand that greatness is never a given. It must be earned. Our journey has never been on-e of short-cuts or settling for less. It has not been the path for the faint-hearted - for those who prefer leisure over work, or seek on-ly the pleasures of riches and fame. Rather, it has been the path for the risk-takers, the doers, the makers of things - some celebrated but more often men and women obscure in their labor, who have carried us up the long, rugged path towards prosperity and freedom.
미 국의 위대함을 다시금 확인하면서 우리는 그 위대함이 결코 저절로 주어진 것이 아니라는 사실을 압니다. 우리의 여정은 결코 지름길이나 작은 성과에 안주하는 길들 중의 하나를 걸어온 것이 아니었습니다. 그 길은 결코 일보다는 여가를 선호하거나 부와 명예의 기쁨만을 추구하는 소심한 자들의 길이 아니었습니다. 오히려 그 길은 위험을 무릅쓰는 이들, 실천하는 이들, 무언가를 만들어 내는 이들의 길이었습니다. 그들 중 몇몇은 유명했지만 대부분은 자신들의 분야에서 드러나지 않은 채 묵묵히 자유와 번영을 위한 길고 험난한 길을 우리와 함께 걸었습니다.

For us, they packed up their few worldly possessions and traveled across oceans in search of a new life. For us, they toiled in sweatshops and settled the West; endured the lash of the whip and plowed the hard earth.
우리를 위해, 그들은 자신들의 얼마 안되는 전재산을 꾸려 새 인생을 찾아 대양을 건넜습니다. 우리를 위해, 그들은 공장에서 힘들게 일하고 서부에 정착해서 채찍질을 감내하며 황야를 일궜습니다.

For us, they fought and died, in places like Concord and Gettysburg; Normandy and Khe Sahn. Time and again these men and women struggled and sacrificed and worked till their hands were raw so that we might live a better life. They saw America as bigger than the sum of our individual ambitions; greater than all the differences of birth or wealth or faction.
우 리를 위해, 그들은 싸웠고 또 콩코드와 게티스버그, 노르망디와 베트남의 케산 같은 곳에서 목숨을 바쳤습니다. 우리가 더 나은 삶을 살 수 있도록 몇 번이고 되풀이 해서 이런 분들은 자신들의 손의 살갗이 벗겨질 때까지 분투하고, 희생하고, 일했습니다. 그들은 우리 미국을 각 개인들의 야망을 모두 합한 것보다 더 큰 나라, 태생과 빈부와 당파의 차이를 뛰어넘은 더 위대한 나라로 생각했습니다.

This is the journey we continue today. We remain the most prosperous, powerful nation on Earth. Our workers are no less productive than when this crisis began. Our minds are no less inventive, our goods and services no less needed than they were last week or last month or last year. Our capacity remains undiminished. But our time of standing pat, of protecting narrow interests and putting off unpleasant decisions - that time has surely passed. Starting today, we must pick ourselves up, dust ourselves off, and begin again the work of remaking America.
이 것이 바로 오늘날 우리가 계속 걸어가고 있는 여정입니다. 우리는 여전히 지구상에서 가장 번영되고 가장 강력한 나라입니다. 우리의 근로자들은 이 위기가 시작됐을 때와 다름없이 생산적입니다. 지난 주, 지난 달, 아니 작년과 다름없이 여전히 우리의 정신은 창의적이고 우리의 재화와 용역을 모두가 필요로 합니다. 우리의 역량은 여전히 줄어들지 않았습니다. 하지만 자기 의견을 고집하거나 편협한 이익을 보호하거나 불쾌한 결정들을 뒤로 미루는 그런 시기는 분명히 지나갔습니다. 오늘부터 우리는 스스로를 추스려 힘을 내고 먼지를 털고 일어나 미국을 재건하는 일을 다시 시작해야 합니다.

For everywhere we look, there is work to be done. The state of the economy calls for action, bold and swift, and we will act - not on-ly to create new jobs, but to lay a new foundation for growth. We will build the roads and bridges, the electric grids and digital lines that feed our commerce and bind us together. We will restore science to its rightful place, and wield technology's wonders to raise health care's quality and lower its cost. We will harness the sun and the winds and the soil to fuel our cars and run our factories. And we will transform our schools and colleges and universities to meet the demands of a new age. All this we can do. And all this we will do.
어 디를 둘러 봐도 해야 할 일은 있습니다. 경제 상황은 대담하고 신속한 행동을 요구하고 있습니다. 우리는 (그러한 요구에 부응해) 새로운 일자리를 창출하고 성장을 위한 새로운 기반을 만들기 위해 행동할 것입니다. 우리는 상업에 활력을 불어넣고 우리를 보다 가깝게 묶어줄 도로와 교량, 전력망과 디지털 통신망을 건설할 것입니다. 우리는 과학을 제자리로 돌려놓을 것입니다. 우리는 의료 체계의 질을 향상시키면서 비용은 낮출 신기술들을 활용할 것입니다. 우리는 태양과 바람, 토양을 이용해 자동차에 연료를 제공하고 공장을 가동할 것입니다. 그리고 우리는 새 시대의 요구에 부응할 수 있도록 각종 학교와 대학을 개혁할 것입니다. 이 모든 것을 우리는 할 수 있고 또 할 것입니다.

Now, there are some who question the scale of our ambitions - who suggest that our system cannot tolerate too many big plans. Their memories are short. For they have forgotten what this country has already done; what free men and women can achieve when imagination is joined to common purpose, and necessity to courage.
그 런데 우리가 밝힌 포부의 규모에 대해 우리의 시스템은 그렇게 많은 거대한 계획들을 감내할 수 없다며 의심을 품는 사람들이 있습니다. 그러나 그들은 자신들의 짧은 기억력을 탓해야 합니다. 왜냐하면 그들은 이 나라가 이미 해낸 일들, 즉 상상력이 공통된 목표와 결합했을 때 그리고 필요와 용기가 결합했을 때 자유인들이 해낸 일들이 무엇인지를 잊어버렸기 때문입니다.

What the cynics fail to understand is that the ground has shifted beneath them - that the stale political arguments that have consumed us for so long no longer apply. The question we ask today is not whether our government is too big or too small, but whether it works - whether it helps families find jobs at a decent wage, care they can afford, a retirement that is dignified. Where the answer is yes, we intend to move forward. Where the answer is no, programs will end. And those of us who manage the public's dollars will be held to account - to spend wisely, reform bad habits, and do our business in the light of day - because on-ly then can we restore the vital trust between a people and their government.
냉 소주의자들은 자신들 아래에 위치한 근본적인 기반이 변했다는 사실과 우리를 오랫동안 소모적으로 이끌어왔던 진부한 정치적 주장들을 더 이상 적용할 수 없다는 사실을 이해하지 못했습니다. 오늘날 우리가 던지는 질문은 큰 정부인가 작은 정부인가 하는 게 아니라 정부가 제대로 기능하고 있는가 하는 것입니다. 즉 정부가 가족들로 하여금 타당한 보수의 직업을 찾을 수 있도록, 여유가 되는 보살핌을 받을 수 있도록, 또는 품위있는 은퇴생활을 할 수 있도록 돕고 있는가 하는 것입니다. 우리는 '예'라는 대답이 있는 곳을 향해 우리는 전진할 것입니다만 "아니오"라는 대답이 있는 곳에서는 (우리는 우리가 준비한) 프로그램들을 끝낼 것입니다. 공공자금을 관리하는 이들은 책임지고 돈을 현명하게 지출하고 악습들을 개혁하고 투명하게 일을 처리하게 될 것입니다. 왜냐하면 그럴 때에만 비로소 국민과 정부 사이에 중요한 신뢰가 회복될 수 있기 때문입니다.

Nor is the question before us whether the market is a force for good or ill. Its power to generate wealth and expand freedom is unmatched, but this crisis has reminded us that without a watchful eye, the market can spin out of control - and that a nation cannot prosper long when it favors on-ly the prosperous.
또 한 우리 앞에 놓인 문제는 시장이 선을 위한 힘인지 악을 위한 힘인지에 관한 것이 아닙니다. 부를 창출해내고 자유를 확산시키는 시장의 힘은 비길 데 없이 막강합니다. 하지만 이번 위기를 통해 우리는 감시의 눈이 없을 때에는 시장이 통제를 벗어나 추락할 수도 있다는 사실과 더불어 한 나라가 부유한 이들에게만 호의를 베풀 때 지속된 번영을 누릴 수 없다는 사실을 깨달을 수 있었습니다.

The success of our economy has always depended not just on the size of our Gross Domestic Product, but on the reach of our prosperity; on our ability to extend opportunity to every willing heart - not out of charity, but because it is the surest route to our common good.
우 리 경제의 성공은 항상 국내총생산(GDP)의 크기에만 의존하는 것이 아닙니다. 자선에 기인하지 않고 공동의 선에 도달하는 가장 확실한 길이기 때문에 의욕을 가진 모든 이들에게까지 기회를 확장시키는 우리의 능력과 번영을 골고루 누리는 범위에도 우리 경제의 성공 여부는 달려 있습니다.

As for our common defense, we reject as false the choice between our safety and our ideals. Our Founding Fathers, faced with perils we can scarcely imagine, drafted a charter to assure the rule of law and the rights of man, a charter expanded by the blood of generations. Those ideals still light the world, and we will not give them up for expedience's sake.
안 보에 관해서 우리는, 안전과 이상 사이에서 한 가지만을 선택하는 것은 잘못으로 간주하고 거부할 것입니다. 우리가 좀처럼 상상하기 힘든 위험과 맞닥뜨리곤 했던 건국의 아버지들은 인권과 법률을 보장하는 헌장을 기초했고 이 헌장은 세대를 거치면서 흘린 피에 의해 신장되었습니다. 그러한 이상들은 여전히 이 세상을 밝게 비추고 있으며 우리는 단순히 편의를 위해 그것들을 포기하지 않을 것입니다.

And so to all other peoples and governments who are watching today, from the grandest capitals to the small village where my father was born: know that America is a friend of each nation and every man, woman, and child who seeks a future of peace and dignity, and that we are ready to lead on-ce more. Recall that earlier generations faced down fascism and communism not just with missiles and tanks, but with sturdy alliances and enduring convictions. They understood that our power alone cannot protect us, nor does it entitle us to do as we please. Instead, they knew that our power grows through its prudent use; our security emanates from the justness of our cause, the force of our example, the tempering qualities of humility and restraint.
그 리고 대국의 수도들에서 제 아버지가 태어난 곳과 같은 작은 마을에 이르기까지 오늘 이 자리를 지켜보고 있는 모든 다른 나라의 정부와 국민들께 말씀드립니다. 평화와 품위있는 미래를 추구하는 모든 나라와 남녀노소에게 있어 미국은 친구라는 사실과 우리 미국이 다시 한 번 앞장서 나갈 준비가 되어 있다는 사실을 여러분들은 알아야 합니다. 그리고 앞선 세대들이 미사일과 탱크가 아닌 견고한 동맹과 영속적인 신념들을 통해 파시즘과 공산주의를 제압했던 사실을 떠올려 보십시오. 그분들은 힘만으로는 우리 자신을 보호할 수 없으며 또한 힘만으로는 우리가 원하는 대로 할 수 있는 권한을 부여받을 수 없다는 점을 이해하고 있었습니다. 대신 그분들은 우리가 힘을 신중히 사용함으로써 힘이 더 커진다는 사실과 함께 우리가 가진 대의의 정당함과 본보기로서의 힘과 겸손과 절제의 유연한 자질로부터 우리의 안보가 확보될 수 있다는 사실을 알고 있었던 것입니다.

We are the keepers of this legacy. Guided by these principles on-ce more, we can meet those new threats that demand even greater effort - even greater cooperation and understanding between nations. We will begin to responsibly leave Iraq to its people, and forge a hard-earned peace in Afghanistan. With old friends and former foes, we will work tirelessly to lessen the nuclear threat, and roll back the specter of a warming planet. We will not apologize for our way of life, nor will we waver in its defense, and for those who seek to advance their aims by inducing terror and slaughtering innocents, we say to you now that our spirit is stronger and cannot be broken; you cannot outlast us, and we will defeat you.
우 리는 그러한 유산의 수호자들입니다. 다시 한 번 이런 원칙들에 의해 인도됐을 때 우리는 세계 각국들의 더 많은 노력과 더 많은 협력과 이해를 요구하는 새로운 위협들에 대해 대처해 나갈 수 있을 것입니다. 우리는 책임있게 이라크를 이라크 국민들에게 넘겨주고 어렵게 얻어낸 아프가니스탄의 평화도 굳건히 벼리기 시작할 것입니다. 우리는 오래된 우방들은 물론이고 과거의 적국들과도 함께 손을 맞잡아 핵위험을 줄이고 지구 온난화의 망령을 쫓아내기 위해 쉬지않고 노력할 것입니다. 그러나 우리는 우리의 방식에 대해 사과하지는 않을 것이고 그러한 방식을 고수하는데 있어 망설이지 않을 것입니다. 그리고 테러를 유도하고 무고한 시민들을 살해함으로써 자신들의 목적을 진전시키려는 이들에게는 이렇게 말할 것입니다. 우리의 정신력은 그들보다 더 강력해서 깨어지지 않을 것이며 그들은 우리보다 더 오래 지속될 수가 없기에 결국 우리는 그들을 패퇴시킬 것이라고 말입니다.

For we know that our patchwork heritage is a strength, not a weakness. We are a nation of Christians and Muslims, Jews and Hindus - and non-believers. We are shaped by every language and culture, drawn from every end of this Earth; and because we have tasted the bitter swill of civil war and segregation, and emerged from that dark chapter stronger and more united, we cannot help but believe that the old hatreds shall someday pass; that the lines of tribe shall soon dissolve; that as the world grows smaller, our common humanity shall reveal itself; and that America must play its role in ushering in a new era of peace.
다 양한 뿌리에서 기인한 우리의 전승은 약점이 아니라 강점이라는 사실을 우리는 압니다. 우리나라는 기독교도와 이슬람교도, 유태교도와 힌두교도 그리고 무신론자들로 이루어진 국가입니다. 우리나라는 지구상 곳곳에서 온 다양한 언어와 문화로 이루어졌습니다. 우리는 남북전쟁과 인종차별의 쓰라림을 실컷 맛보았고 또한 보다 강하고 단결된 모습으로 어둠을 가르고 나온 경험이 있습니다. 그렇기 때문에 우리는 오래된 증오가 언젠가는 사라질 것이라는 사실과 부족적 혈통의 끈이 머지않아 해소되어 사라질 것이라는 사실, 세계가 점점 작아짐에 따라 공통된 인간성이 저절로 모습을 드러낼 것이라는 사실, 그리고 우리 미국이 새로운 평화의 시대로 안내하는 역할을 반드시 해야한다는 사실을 믿지 않을 수 없습니다.

To the Muslim world, we seek a new way forward, based on mutual interest and mutual respect. To those leaders around the globe who seek to sow conflict, or blame their society's ills on the West - know that your people will judge you on what you can build, not what you destroy. To those who cling to power through corruption and deceit and the silencing of dissent, know that you are on the wrong side of history; but that we will extend a hand if you are willing to unclench your fist.
이 슬람 세계 여러분, 여러분은 우리 미국이 상호이해와 상호존중에 기반한 새로운 진전된 방식을 추구한다는 사실을 알아야 합니다. 분쟁의 씨앗을 뿌리거나 이슬람 사회 내부의 병폐를 서구의 탓으로 돌리고자 하는 전세계 이슬람 세계의 지도자들 여러분, 여러분의 국민들은 여러분들이 파괴한 것이 아닌 여러분들이 건설한 것을 기초로 여러분들을 판단할 것이라는 사실을 알아야 합니다. 부패와 협잡 그리고 반대자들을 침묵시킴으로써 정권을 유지하려는 자들은 현재 자신들이 역사의 그릇된 쪽에 서 있다는 사실과 더불어 그럼에도 불구하고 그들이 주먹을 펴고 철권통치를 포기하려 한다면 우리는 기꺼이 손을 내밀어 도와줄 것이라는 사실을 알아야 할 것입니다.

To the people of poor nations, we pledge to work alongside you to make your farms flourish and let clean waters flow; to nourish starved bodies and feed hungry minds. And to those nations like ours that enjoy relative plenty, we say we can no longer afford indifference to suffering outside our borders; nor can we consume the world's resources without regard to effect. For the world has changed, and we must change with it.
가 난한 나라의 국민들에게 우리는 당신들의 농장을 번성케 하고 깨끗한 물을 흐르게 하며 굶주린 몸과 허기진 마음에 양분을 제공하기 위해 당신들과 나란히 일을 하겠다는 약속을 드립니다. 또한 우리처럼 비교적 부유한 나라의 국민들에게 우리는 더 이상 우리 국경 밖의 고통에 대한 무관심을 보이지 않을 것이며 또한 더 이상 세계의 자원을 결과에 대한 고려 없이 낭비하지 않을 것이라는 말씀을 드립니다. 왜냐하면 세계는 변했고 또 이에 발맞춰 우리도 변해야 하기 때문입니다.

As we consider the road that unfolds before us, we remember with humble gratitude those brave Americans who, at this very hour, patrol far-off deserts and distant mountains. They have something to tell us today, just as the fallen heroes who lie in Arlington whisper through the ages. We honor them not on-ly because they are guardians of our liberty, but because they embody the spirit of service; a willingness to find meaning in something greater than themselves. And yet, at this moment - a moment that will define a generation - it is precisely this spirit that must inhabit us all.
우 리 앞에 펼쳐진 길을 생각할 때면 우리는 바로 이 순간에도 머나먼 사막과 산악지대에서 순찰 활동을 하는 용감한 미국인들을 감사하며 기억합니다. 알링턴 국립묘지에 잠들어 있는 영웅들이 시대를 아우르며 우리들에게 끊임없이 속삭여주듯 오늘날의 그들 또한 우리에게 뭔가 할 말이 있을 것입니다. 그들이 단지 자유의 수호자이기 때문에서가 아니라 자기 자신들보다 더 위대한 무엇으로부터 의미를 찾으려는 봉사정신을 몸소 체화했기 때문에 우리는 그들에게 경의를 표합니다. 그리고 한 세대를 규정지을 만한 순간인 지금 이 순간, 우리 모두의 마음에 깃들어야 할 정신이야 말로 정확히 바로 이 봉사정신입니다.

For as much as government can do and must do, it is ultimately the faith and determination of the American people upon which this nation relies. It is the kindness to take in a stranger when the levees break, the selflessness of workers who would rather cut their hours than see a friend lose their job which sees us through our darkest hours. It is the firefighter's courage to storm a stairway filled with smoke, but also a parent's willingness to nurture a child, that finally decides our fate.
정 부가 최대한의 역량으로 일을 해야만 하고 또한 해낼 수 있기 위해 우리나라가 의지할 수 있는 것은 궁극적으로 국민들의 신뢰와 결단입니다. 제방이 무너졌을 때 낯선 이를 집안에 들이는 친절함이나 친구가 직장을 잃는 걸 보기보다는 자신의 근로시간을 줄이려 하는 무욕의 마음도 우리로 하여금 가장 어두운 시간들을 날 수 있게 하는 덕목들일 것입니다. 연기로 가득찬 계단에 뛰어드는 소방관의 용기나 아이를 키우는 부모의 마음 또한 결국 우리의 운명을 결정할 것입니다.

Our challenges may be new. The instruments with which we meet them may be new. But those values upon which our success depends - honesty and hard work, courage and fair play, tolerance and curiosity, loyalty and patriotism - these things are old. These things are true. They have been the quiet force of progress throughout our history. What is demanded then is a return to these truths. What is required of us now is a new era of responsibility - a recognition, on the part of every American, that we have duties to ourselves, our nation, and the world, duties that we do not grudgingly accept but rather seize gladly, firm in the knowledge that there is nothing so satisfying to the spirit, so defining of our character, than giving our all to a difficult task.
새 로운 도전들이 우리를 기다리고 있습니다. 우리가 그 도전들을 맞이할 때 사용할 도구들도 새로울 겁니다. 하지만 우리의 성공이 달려 있는 정직, 근면, 용기, 공정성, 인내, 호기심, 성실, 애국심과 같은 덕목들은 오래되고 또한 진실된 것들입니다. 우리 역사를 통틀어 이 덕목들은 진보의 조용한 힘이 되어 왔습니다. (도전과 맞닥뜨릴) 그때 요구되는 것이 바로 이런 진실어린 덕목들로 복귀하는 것입니다. 지금 우리에게 필요한 것은 새 시대의 책임감, 즉 모든 미국인들이 자기 자신과 조국 그리고 전 세계에 대한 의무를 인식하는 것입니다. 여기서 의무란 마지 못해 응낙하는 의무가 아닐 뿐더러 어려운 책무에 우리의 모든 것을 내맡기는 그런 것이라기보다는 우리의 정신을 만족시키고 우리의 기질을 정의하는 데 있어 이만한 것이 없다는 사실에 대한 이해와 함께 기꺼이 그리고 단호히 받아들이는 그런 의무를 말합니다.

This is the price and the promise of citizenship.
이것이 바로 시민권에 대한 댓가이자 약속입니다.

This is the source of our confidence - the knowledge that God calls on us to shape an uncertain destiny.
이것이 바로 우리의 자신감의 원천이자 신이 우리들로 하여금 불확실한 운명을 스스로 개척해 나가기를 요구했다는 사실을 아는 것입니다.

This is the meaning of our liberty and our creed - why men and women and children of every race and every faith can join in celebration across this magnificent mall, and why a man whose father less than sixty years ago might not have been served at a local restaurant can now stand before you to take a most sacred oath.
이 것이 바로 우리의 자유와 신조의 의미이자 인종과 신념에 상관없이 모든 남녀노소가 이 거대한 취임식 행사에 참석할 있는 이유 그리고 겨우 60년 전 보다 더 최근의 시절에도 동네 식당조차 출입할 수 없었던 아버지를 가진 제가 여러분들 앞에 이렇게 서서 신성한 선서를 할 수 있게 된 이유입니다.

So let us mark this day with remembrance, of who we are and how far we have traveled. In the year of America's birth, in the coldest of months, a small band of patriots huddled by dying campfires on the shores of an icy river. The capital was abandoned. The enemy was advancing. The snow was stained with blood. At a moment when the outcome of our revolution was most in doubt, the father of our nation ordered these words be read to the people:
다 함께 우리가 현재 누구이며 또 우리가 얼마나 먼 길을 여행해 왔는지를 기억하며 오늘을 표시해 둡시다. 미국이 건국되는 해의 가장 추웠던 달에 한 무리의 애국자들은 얼어붙은 강가의 꺼져가는 모닥불 옆에 몸을 움츠리고 모였습니다. 수도는 버려졌고 적군은 전진하고 있었습니다. 눈은 피로 물들었습니다. 혁명의 결과에 대해 가장 강한 의구심이 피어 오르는 그 순간 우리 건국의 아버지들은 다음 글을 국민들에게 읽게 하였습니다.

"Let it be told to the future world...that in the depth of winter, when nothing but hope and virtue could survive...that the city and the country, alarmed at on-e common danger, came forth to meet it."
"오직 희망과 미덕만이 살아남을 수 있는 한겨울이었지만 공동의 위험에 놀란 도시와 농촌이 모두 그 위험에 맞서기 위해 나섰다는 사실을 미래 세대에게 들려주도록 합시다."

America. In the face of our common dangers, in this winter of our hardship, let us remember these timeless words. With hope and virtue, let us brave on-ce more the icy currents, and endure what storms may come. Let it be said by our children's children that when we were tested we refused to let this journey end, that we did not turn back nor did we falter; and with eyes fixed on the horizon and God's grace upon us, we carried forth that great gift of freedom and delivered it safely to future generations.
이 것이 바로 미국입니다. 공동의 위험에도 불구하고, 이러한 역경의 겨울에도 불구하고, 이 불멸의 구절들을 기억하도록 합시다. 희망과 미덕을 가지고 다시 한 번 살을 에는 듯한 조류에 용감히 맞섭시다. 그리고 어떤 폭풍우가 다가오더라도 참고 견딥시다. 우리가 시험에 들게 됐을 때 우리는 이 여정을 끝내기를 거절했다고, 결코 등을 돌리거나 뒷걸음치지 않았다고 우리 아이들의 아이들로 하여금 말할 수 있게 합시다. 그리고 신의 은총과 함께 지평선을 꿋꿋이 응시하면서 전진해 나갔기에 자유라는 위대한 선물을 미래 세대들에게 안전히 전달해 줄 수 있었다고 말할 수 있게 합시다.

Thank you,
감사합니다.

 

God bless you, God bless the United States of America.
하나님께서 여러분과 미합중국에 복 주시기를 원합니다.
2009/10/23 19:26 2009/10/23 19:26
Posted
Filed under About Knowledge/English
* What seems to be..... + .......

* something is wrong ......


Ex>


What seems to be the trouble with the car ?
Something is wrong with the breaks, I think.

What seems to be the most import point with ..... ?

It seems to be .........
2009/10/16 08:53 2009/10/16 08:53
Posted
Filed under About Knowledge/English
distinct BO. 이상한 냄새
settle down ;정착하다
2009/03/24 00:48 2009/03/24 00:48